Accountability: An Unwritten Element

Last year around this time, we were mulling over the Fall Conference and Webcast delivered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). So much has changed in the way we collaborate and interact with each other, both in our professions and personal lives. With all of us keeping our state and local guidelines in mind, we do our best to keep it compliant so we can stay healthy. The likelihood that we will return to the good old days of Ubering to the CMS Woodlawn office soon are slim.

Since we have a public health emergency that requires us to comply with a set of rules in the spirit of slowing or stopping the spread, I’ve been thinking about accountability. When the unexpected happens, who speaks up? Who takes ownership?

I read a recent compliance and ethics report from LRN which noted that when it comes to compliance failures, a poor culture simply deteriorates standing rules. Culture determines whether policies and guidelines will be followed or ignored. The report also showed that in companies with significant compliance failures, key leaders did not take ownership of the problems. Employees raised concerns and reported either being ignored or pressured to look the other way.

For a policy or a code of conduct to be effective, it cannot simply sit on a shelf. The culture within an organization must promote compliance and ethics to demonstrate accountability. Now that many employees are scattered to the wind, is the corporate culture message getting lost in the fray? If so, I recommend making it a priority to communicate a brief message once a week to remind your team about the organization’s mission, commitment to customers, and culture of compliance. Remember, there is no CMS playbook on culture, but you know it when you see it (and when you don’t!).